Spotter's Quiz No 2
Long-Range Land Planes

9 Junkers Ju-90

Built first for military use, in the prototype Ju-89, then for commercial transport, this sleek long-range landplane is again in military service. Powered by four Junkers Jumo liquid-cooled engines, each rated at 1,150 hp, it has maximum speed of 250 mph, range estimated at 1,875 miles, according to Aerosphere. It has wing span of 114' 10", is 86' 3" long, weighs 50,000 pounds loaded, accommodates fifty troops.

Wing is low cantilever type with swept-back leading edge, raked trailing edge and tips.

Engines are liquid-cooled, with underslung nacelles extending well forward from wing leading edge.

Fuselage is long and slender, extends beyond tail planes, has extremely long rounded nose.

Tail is twin-fin-and-rudder type, with horizontal surfaces high and far forward on fuselage.

Raked Wing. Twin Fins

10 Handley Page Halifax

Christened by Lord Halifax little more than a year ago, this box-like bomber is now in its second modification. Powered by four Rolls-Royce liquid-cooled engines developing a total of more than 5,000 hp, it has relatively low speed but carries tremendous bomb loads. It has wing span of 99', is 70' long, and measures 22' in height. Saab-sided and ugly, the Halifax was designed for production line speed rather than air speed.

Wing is mid-wing cantilever type, straight center section, sweep-back and taper on outboard panels.

Engines are liquid-cooled, rectangular nacelles under wing, extend forward from leading edge.

Fuselage is long, slab-sided, with jutting nose, large turret behind tail, deep belly, straight top.

Tail is twin type, triangular fin, square rudder, rectangular tailplane with slight sweep-back.

Square Nacelles and Tail

11 Avro Lancaster

Newest addition to Britain's long-range day raiding forces, the Lancaster is reportedly powered by both liquid-cooled Rolls-Royce engines and Bristol radials. All released photos show the inline engines. Performance details are restricted but speed is estimated at slightly over 300 mph, while Lancaster raids on Danzig indicate range of over 2,000 miles. It has wing span of 102', is 69' long, 19' 7" high.

Wing is high-mid cantilever type, straight center section, sweep-back, taper from inboard nacelles.

Engines are liquid-cooled in most cases, entirely underslung, well forward from leading edge.

Fuselage is slab-sided, has powered turret midway between wing and tail, large gun turret aft of tail.

Tail is twin-fin-and-rudder type, with egg-shaped vertical surfaces, sweep-back, taper on tailplanes.

Wing Contour. Vertical Fin

12 Focke-Wulf Kurier

Military adaptation of the successful Condor design, the Fw-200K is used for long-range reconnaissance, mine-laying, convoy attack. Powered by four Bramo Fafnir radial engines developing total of 3,400 hp, it has range of 2,430 miles, maximum speed of 250 mph, and weighs 48,500 pounds fully loaded. It has wing span of 108' 3", is 78' 3" long, and measures 23' 4" in height.

Wing is low cantilever type, swept-back leading edge, round tips, semi-raked trailing edge.

Engines have radial cowlings, inboard nacelles underslung, outboard engines set into wing.

Fuselage is long, thin, with wing well forward. Long, off-center bombing post is visible on bottom.

Tail is monoplane type, wide, triangular vertical tail squared on top. Tailplane has sweep-back.

Off-Center Bomb Post

13 Short Stirling

Grandfather of all four-engine bombers blasting the Reich for the RAF, the Stirling is a product of Britain's oldest aeronautical firm; is now being manufactured in twenty widely-separated aircraft plants. It is powered by either four Bristol or Wright radial engines rated at 1,600 hp. It carries 18,000 pounds of bombs in the 42-foot bomb bay, has wing span of 99 feet, 1 inch, is 87' 3" long, 22' 9" high.

Wing is mid-wing cantilever type with marked dihedral, swept-back and tapered.

Engines have radial cowlings, underslung inboard nacelles, outboard engines set into wing.

Fuselage has straight sides, bottom, top, with canopy above top line, blunt nose, tail turret.

Tail is monoplane type with narrow triangular fin, rudder. Swept-back and almost straight tailplane.

Inset. Underslung Nacelles

14 Consolidated B-24

Officially described as the Liberator II, this four-engine bomber is now joining daylight raids on Europe. Earlier model, lacking powered turret, was used only for ferry service by the gun-conscious British. Powered by four 1,200-hp Pratt & Whitney radials, it has top speed of over 300 mph, full-load range exceeding 3,000 miles. It has wing span of 110', is 63' long, measures 19' in overall height.

Wing is high cantilever type, extremely long and with high aspect ratio. Tapered trailing edge.

Engines have radial cowlings and underslung nacelles. All engines parallel, extend well forward.

Fuselage is wide and high, has straight sides, very little taper to protruding rear gun turret.

Tail is twin-fin-and-rudder type with symmetrical oval vertical surfaces, rectangular tailplane.

High Wing. Twin Oval Fins

15 Blohm & Voss 142

Omitted from official Army lists of first-line planes, while its seaplane version is included, the Ha-142 used in the Norwegian campaign may again be an important German weapon of invasion. Powered by four 880-hp BMW radial engines, it has top speed of 248 mph, maximum range of 2,732 miles. It carries thirty or more fully-armed soldiers. It has wing span of 96' 9", is 63' 11" long.

Wing is low cantilever type of gull design, straight leading and trailing edges, extremely thick chord.

Engines have radial cowlings, inboard nacelles at juncture of anhedral and dihedral wing sections.

Fuselage is extremely long, perfectly round, terminating in sharp cone aft of tail assembly.

Tail is twin-fin-and-rudder type, with sharp triangular fins, straight stabilizers, raked elevators.

Inverted Gull Wing

16 Boeing B-17

Carrying as many guns as any bomber in the world, flying well over 30,000 feet at speeds in excess of 300 mph, and bombing Germany with uncanny accuracy, the Boeing Flying Fortress is now the queen of daylight bombers. Both the B-17E and B-17F are externally similar but incorporate different power plants and armament. The Fortress has a wing span of 103' 9", is 73' long, measures 15' 6" in height.

Wing is low cantilever type, swept-back leading edge, tapered trailing edge, round tips, dihedral.

Engines have radial cowlings, inset nacelles extend well forward from wing leading edge.

Fuselage is streamlined cigar shape, ball turret on bottom, powered turret on top, side gun hatches.

Tail is monoplane type with long, sloping dorsal fin, swept-back stabilizers, taper on elevators.

Dorsal Fin. Bottom Turret

This "Spotter's Quiz" column was originally published in the December, 1942, "Complete Spotter's Guide" issue of Air News magazine, vol 3, no 8, pp 19, 26-27.
The original Quiz includes 16 photos and 8 three-view silhouettes, 2 photos and 1 three-view for each type listed.
Photos credited to Monkmeyer, British Combine, European, Rudy Arnold, Air News photo, Boeing.